WhatsApp, the widely used messaging app, is about to find out how much leverage one billion users gets you. 

The Mountain View-based company is facing scrutiny after it was revealed that the accused Westminster Bridge attacker used the service to send a message shortly before killing four people and injuring scores of others in London on March 22. 

The message was encrypted and the authorities are not happy about being unable to read it. And so what's a law-abiding company to do? Build a backdoor allowing government officials, and potentially nefarious actors, a future way in? Read more...

More about Mobile, Terror Attacks, Terrorism, London, and Whatsapp'>
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WhatsApp says it won’t create an encryption backdoor, and that’s a good thing

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Sometimes being popular gives you the power to do what’s right.

WhatsApp, the widely used messaging app, is about to find out how much leverage one billion users gets you. 

The Mountain View-based company is facing scrutiny after it was revealed that the accused Westminster Bridge attacker used the service to send a message shortly before killing four people and injuring scores of others in London on March 22. 

The message was encrypted and the authorities are not happy about being unable to read it. And so what’s a law-abiding company to do? Build a backdoor allowing government officials, and potentially nefarious actors, a future way in? Read more…

More about Mobile, Terror Attacks, Terrorism, London, and Whatsapp

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