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Very hungry caterpillars could be the answer to the Earth’s massive plastic bag problem

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A Spanish biologist and amateur beekeeper may have discovered a way to deal with some of the trillion plastic bags humans use and toss annually — and the answer lies in the humble caterpillar.

Or, more specifically, the Galleria mellonella, or wax moth.

Federica Bertocchini, from Spain’s Institute of Biomedicine & Biotechnology of Cantabria, was actually working away at her side hustle—beekeeping—when she made the discovery that could make a huge dent in Earth’s plastic problem.

Finding a bunch of wax moths in her hives, where they were busy munching on the wax that her bees need to make honeycomb, she dumped the pesky critters in a plastic bag. On her return, she discovered they’d eaten their way out of the bag. Read more…

More about Caterpillar, Pollution, Plastic Bags, Science, and Lifestyle

, ,

Very hungry caterpillars could be the answer to the Earth’s massive plastic bag problem

TwitterFacebook

A Spanish biologist and amateur beekeeper may have discovered a way to deal with some of the trillion plastic bags humans use and toss annually — and the answer lies in the humble caterpillar.

Or, more specifically, the Galleria mellonella, or wax moth.

Federica Bertocchini, from Spain’s Institute of Biomedicine & Biotechnology of Cantabria, was actually working away at her side hustle—beekeeping—when she made the discovery that could make a huge dent in Earth’s plastic problem.

Finding a bunch of wax moths in her hives, where they were busy munching on the wax that her bees need to make honeycomb, she dumped the pesky critters in a plastic bag. On her return, she discovered they’d eaten their way out of the bag. Read more…

More about Caterpillar, Pollution, Plastic Bags, Science, and Lifestyle

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