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San Francisco sues Equifax on behalf of 15 million Californians affected by the breach

 Equifax is not only in deep for a class-action lawsuit over a breach exposing 143 million U.S. citizen’s social security numbers and a subpoena in New York, it’s now being sued by the city of San Francisco. S.F. City Attorney Dennis Herrera filed the lawsuit against the credit reporting agency in San Francisco Superior Court for “failing to protect the personal data of more… Read More

about more than 140 million people

Richard Smith, who has been chief executive of the company since 2005, will "retire." The wording allows Smith to ostensibly leave on his own accord, but there was little doubt that the ongoing disaster of the Equifax hack would eventually cost him his job. 

Equifax is currently the subject of a variety of investigations, including by the Federal Trade Commission. There's also plenty of lawsuits, including a $70 billion class-action suit in the works.  Read more...

More about Equifax, Equifax Hack, Business, and Cybersecurity'>
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Equifax CEO ‘retires’ after massive data breach

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Equifax’s CEO is stepping down weeks after a massive data breach at the credit-reporting company was revealed to have leaked sensitive information about more than 140 million people

Richard Smith, who has been chief executive of the company since 2005, will “retire.” The wording allows Smith to ostensibly leave on his own accord, but there was little doubt that the ongoing disaster of the Equifax hack would eventually cost him his job. 

Equifax is currently the subject of a variety of investigations, including by the Federal Trade Commission. There’s also plenty of lawsuits, including a $70 billion class-action suit in the works.  Read more…

More about Equifax, Equifax Hack, Business, and Cybersecurity

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Here’s what your identity sells for on the dark web

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How much is your personal data worth to you? A lot. (Thanks, Equifax.) And how much is it worth to an identity thief?

You may be surprised, or insulted, or enraged, to find out.

Verified high-limit credit cards from countries including the U.S., Japan, and South Korea are selling on the dark web for the bitcoin equivalent of about $10 to $20, according to an annual report on cybercrime by Secureworks, a unit of Dell Inc.

The dark web is “the collection of Internet forums, digital shop fronts and chat rooms that cybercriminals use to form alliances, trade tools and techniques, and sell compromised data that can include banking details, personally identifiable information and other content,” as Secureworks defines it.   Read more…

More about Cybersecurity, Dark Web, Equifax, Equifax Hack, and Business

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Equifax was reportedly hacked almost five months before its first disclosed date

 Equifax learned about a major breach in its systems in March, well before it disclosed a massive breach earlier this month that included sensitive information for 143 million consumers, according to a new report from Bloomberg. Bloomberg is also reporting that both breaches may have involved the same intruders, which is not a good look for the company that is reeling from the massive breach… Read More

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Credit Karma says it will offer credit monitoring for Equifax following this month’s huge breach

 Credit Karma said it will add Equifax to its credit monitoring service as part of its free product, which proactively notifies members of significant changes to their credit report. It includes a whole suite of notifications for significant changes in credit queries, such as opening new accounts, a change in the status of an account, new personal information or a hard inquiry or application… Read More

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Credit Karma says it will offer credit monitoring for Equifax following this month’s huge breach

 Credit Karma said it will add Equifax to its credit monitoring service as part of its free product, which proactively notifies members of significant changes to their credit report. It includes a whole suite of notifications for significant changes in credit queries, such as opening new accounts, a change in the status of an account, new personal information or a hard inquiry or application… Read More

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Security researchers find gross deficiencies on Equifax Argentina site

 As we close in on a week since Equifax announced the massive hack that could potentially have exposed the financial information of 143 million consumers in the U.S., we have been left with many questions. How could a firm entrusted with our most sensitive financial data allow this to happen? Well, security researcher, Brian Krebs (who broke the Target breach story in 2014), reports… Read More

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No, a chatbot can’t automatically sue Equifax for $25,000

 Making the rounds today is a chatbot that claims it will let you sue Equifax for thousands of dollars in small claims court without using a lawyer. The Verge boldly stated you can claim up to $25,000 dollars, and the chatbot says that it’s the “first case of a fully automated lawsuit.” While it would be cool to fill out a form and get a check a few months later, this… Read More

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Congress demands answers from Equifax

 A strongly worded letter from the Democrats of the House Committee on Energy and Commerce questions Equifax on pretty much every aspect of its disastrous breach, from how such an immense security lapse happened in the first place to the company’s apparently non-functional notification site. Read More

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Equifax says that it will waive credit freeze fees for 30 days

 In response to public outrage over its ongoing bungled response, Equifax stated on Twitter that it will waive credit freeze fees for 30 days. With so much personal data running around out there in the wild, credit freezes are one of the only things that those affected by the Equifax breach can do to protect themselves. Equifax’s existing offer of free credit monitoring for one year is… Read More