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Incredible photos from the best space photographers of 2017

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Interstellar dust shines in starlight light-years away from Earth. Green curtains of the auroras shimmer over a ghostly landscape in Iceland. A famous crater stands out in relief against the surface of the moon.

These are just a few of the winning photos chosen as part of the annual Insight Astronomy Photographer of the Year contest in 2017.

The images speak for themselves, so put them up on the big screen and scroll through. We guarantee you won’t be disappointed.

M63: Star Streams and the Sunflower Galaxy – Galaxies Winner

A bright, spiral galaxy, Messier 63 looks like a star necklace in which the stars have crashed outwards from the galaxy’s centre, producing this fantastic long train. The ghostly star arcs of the Sunflower galaxy had long been an elusive target for the photographer, but upon deciding to take the image in one of the darkest places in Europe – the Rozhen Observatory in the Rhodopes Mountains, Bulgaria – he successfully captured the astronomical object. Despite a warm winter and an early spring, there were snow drifts more than one metre high and it took a lot of effort to break through them, but the photographer prevailed, and captured the glittering galaxy in the unbelievably dark and crystal clear of Rhozen. Read more...

More about Space, Science, Photos, Space Photos, and Astronomy
,

Incredible photos from the best space photographers of 2017

TwitterFacebook

Interstellar dust shines in starlight light-years away from Earth. Green curtains of the auroras shimmer over a ghostly landscape in Iceland. A famous crater stands out in relief against the surface of the moon.

These are just a few of the winning photos chosen as part of the annual Insight Astronomy Photographer of the Year contest in 2017.

The images speak for themselves, so put them up on the big screen and scroll through. We guarantee you won’t be disappointed.

M63: Star Streams and the Sunflower Galaxy – Galaxies Winner

A bright, spiral galaxy, Messier 63 looks like a star necklace in which the stars have crashed outwards from the galaxy’s centre, producing this fantastic long train. The ghostly star arcs of the Sunflower galaxy had long been an elusive target for the photographer, but upon deciding to take the image in one of the darkest places in Europe – the Rozhen Observatory in the Rhodopes Mountains, Bulgaria – he successfully captured the astronomical object. Despite a warm winter and an early spring, there were snow drifts more than one metre high and it took a lot of effort to break through them, but the photographer prevailed, and captured the glittering galaxy in the unbelievably dark and crystal clear of Rhozen. Read more...

More about Space, Science, Photos, Space Photos, and Astronomy
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