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This formula explains why NYC is great for ride-sharing and Sydney is terrible

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The ebb and flow of a city may feel entirely unique, but it turns out there are universal laws that may govern the chaos of your commute.

A team from the Senseable City Lab at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have created what they call a law of "shareability." Using inputs like traffic speed and urban density, they think they can predict the potential for ride-sharing in any city.

And no, not Uber's version of ride-sharing — basically a glorified taxi service — but actual car trips shared between strangers.

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Google Maps now lets you share your location with friends and family for a specific period of time

 Google Maps has today launched a new feature to allow you to share your location with others. While that might seem creepy, it’s not the first to add this type of functionality. Facebook tells you when a friend is nearby – it even lets you “wave” at them and gives you the option to send a message if they holler back. Foursquare’s Swarm lets you check in wherever… Read More

Lyft's similar arranagement with Southeast Asian firm Grab, is also over. 

Ola, in India, has been approached for comment.

The original agreement was hailed at the time as a way for the foursome to stymy some of Uber's ravenous global growth, but that's all done now. Read more...

More about Ride Hailing Apps, Grab, Ola, Uber, and Lyft '>
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Lyft’s ‘anti-Uber alliance’ was quietly called off

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In late 2015, an "anti-Uber alliance" was formed between four global ride hailing companies. Now at least two of those partners have quietly dropped out.

Lyft and China's Didi Chuxing's roaming arrangement, to allow users to book rides on each other's platforms, was suspended in January, a Didi spokesperson confirmed. 

Lyft's similar arranagement with Southeast Asian firm Grab, is also over. 

Ola, in India, has been approached for comment.

The original agreement was hailed at the time as a way for the foursome to stymy some of Uber's ravenous global growth, but that's all done now. Read more...

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Lyft is being mighty elusive about whether it’ll finally come to Australia

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Australia is a one ride share company town. Want to take a trip in someone else's depreciating asset? Uber's almost your only option (sorry, GoCatch).

Americans, of course, have an alternative: Lyft. So when director of strategic partnerships, Insiya Lokhandwala, appeared on the schedule of Brisbane's Myriad startup festival in late March, you had to wonder: Was Australia's moment finally here? 

Lyft's communication director was noncommittal. "Nothing to share at this time," Sheila Bryson said in an email. "FWIW our execs speak all over." Read more...

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The story in question quoted a CNN interview with the Huffington Post co-founder, in which she detailed the results of an investigation at Uber after an ex-employee detailed allegations of sexism on a public blog post in February. 

During the conference call Tuesday, Huffington answered a question about sexism at the ride-sharing company and in the same breath called out CNN for its since-corrected headline that originally paraphrased her saying, "Sexism at Uber isn't systemic." Read more...

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