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Hmm, maybe this is why Trump doesn’t want to attend the White House Correspondents’ Dinner

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On Saturday, Donald Trump made history as the first president to bow out of the White House Correspondents' Dinner.

And while this has much to do with Trump's ever-worsening battle with the press and his constant struggle to book talent, it's also worth remembering that, to be frank, Trump probably has another reason for ditching:

He usually gets clobbered at these things.

So, in the interest of, uh, elucidation, please enjoy these videos of Trump getting roasted at the 2011 and 2016 White House Correspondents' Dinner. Better yet, enjoy Trump's mirthless reactions. They're uncomfortable to watch, but extremely worth it. Read more...

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The president offered no explanation for the decision, but it's not hard to chance a few guesses for his reasoning. Among the possibilities:  Read more...

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Donald Trump makes history, bows out of White House Correspondents dinner

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Amid an ever-escalating war with the media, Donald Trump tweeted Saturday that he wouldn't attend the White House Correspondents Association's annual dinner. The dinner is an opportunity for a comedian to roast the press and the president, and for the president to roast everyone else. Trump's absence would mark the first time in the event's nearly 100-year history a president has refused to attend. 

I will not be attending the White House Correspondents' Association Dinner this year. Please wish everyone well and have a great evening!

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) February 25, 2017

The president offered no explanation for the decision, but it's not hard to chance a few guesses for his reasoning. Among the possibilities:  Read more...

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Science is already political. Get over it and start marching.

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As the March for Science in Washington, D.C., grows, so does its criticism. 

This should be expected. Scientists are encouraged to look at even the most widely accepted statistic or finding and question it. So of course, as soon as the march, scheduled for April 22, was announced, people began to critically examine its message, mission and goals.

This critical examination has led to a better, more inclusive diversity statement and a clearer focus for the organizers who have seen their grassroots mission explode on social media.  Read more...

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ACLU launches website for anyone that wants to join the resistance

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The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) saw a flood of donations as Americans took up the resistance to Donald Trump just weeks into his presidency. Now, it's trying to put some of that money towards helping everyday Americans who are fighting Trump policies on the ground.

The organisation has launched PeoplePower.org, a website where individuals can find "digital tools" to protest and take part in the grassroots efforts to stand up for Americans' rights and make sure the current presidency doesn't step on those rights.

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FCC head puts the brakes on new ISP privacy rules

In the latest chip at net neutrality, Federal Communications Commission has Chairman Ajit Pai has moved to put a halt to a set of privacy rules designed to shield customers' personal data from internet service providers.
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This app wants to warn undocumented immigrants of raids in Trump’s America

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Just 24 days into Donald Trump's presidency, more than 680 undocumented immigrants were forced to leave the country in a series of mass raids. That's an average of about 28 people each day.

Now, 27-year-old web developer and designer Celso Mireles, once an undocumented immigrant himself, is developing an open source app that will show people exactly when and where these raids are happening, as Vice's Motherboard reports.

While still in the development phase, RedadAlertas (or "raid alerts") plans to give verified, secure information about when the government sends in U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officers to round people up. Read more...

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‘Harry Potter’ passages that are shockingly similar to 2017 politics

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Comparisons between the plot of the Harry Potter series and the Trump administration are apparently not stopping any time soon.

What started as the post-election mantra of "Even Hogwarts fell to Voldemort" has morphed into daily comparisons between Potter villains and Trump appointees. These parallels have been criticized as being reductive, juvenile and politically useless — Donald Trump is a real human being capable of inflicting real harm and Voldemort is a made-up snake man from a YA series, after all.

But what these critics don't seem to realize is that there are several very real and certainly not Photoshopped moments in the Potter series that seem to directly and literally speak to our current political situation. Read more...

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In lieu of a daily press conference, White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer held a closed-door gaggle with reporters, hand-selecting which media organizations had the privilege of attending. CNN, the New York Times, BuzzFeed, the Los Angeles Times and Politico were denied access, prompting a flurry of confusion and outrage. 

While reporters from the Associated Press and Time reportedly boycotted the meeting, the media outlets banned found an unexpected but increasingly vocal ally: Fox News' Shep Smith. 

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Fox News’ Shep Smith attempts to explain ‘Fake News’ to Donald Trump

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"CNN's reporting was not fake news," Fox News host Shep Smith said on air on Friday.

In lieu of a daily press conference, White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer held a closed-door gaggle with reporters, hand-selecting which media organizations had the privilege of attending. CNN, the New York Times, BuzzFeed, the Los Angeles Times and Politico were denied access, prompting a flurry of confusion and outrage. 

While reporters from the Associated Press and Time reportedly boycotted the meeting, the media outlets banned found an unexpected but increasingly vocal ally: Fox News' Shep Smith. 

More about Fake News, Sean Spicer, Donald Trump, Politics, and Watercooler
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The Engadget Podcast Ep 29: Re-Offender

Managing editor Dana Wollman and senior editor Nathan Ingraham join host Terrence O'Brien to talk about the biggest tech stories of the week. Of course, that means Uber and the growing controversy around its corporate culture -- including allegations...
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Samsung to change donation policies amid bribery scandal

In the last six months, Samsung has been no stranger to scandal. Since September, it's hurriedly dealt with the fallout from its Galaxy Note 7 recall, and in recent weeks has been thrust into an investigation over bribery claims involving some of its...