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Scientists made the first ‘unhackable’ quantum video call

Following extensive testing earlier this year, China has now deployed its quantum communications work in the form of the first ever quantum-safe video call. The call, between the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the Austrian Academy of Sciences, marks…

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Man tries to escape hotel bill by crossing a telephone wire over to the next building

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If you’re afraid of heights, look away. A man in China tried fleeing a hotel bill by escaping through a high-rise window, and climbing onto thin telephone wires to get to another building all the way across the street.

Unfortunately, he appears to have underestimated how difficult that would be, and he’s seen struggling to keep his balance, even swinging his body over the swaying wire to anchor it.

Eventually, he ends up trapped between two wires, dangling at a height estimated to be around the 19th floor, based on video footage. Read more…

More about China, Viral Video, Culture, and Other

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South Korea cracks down on use of digital cash for crowdfunding

South Koreans who were planning to raise funds using cryptocurrency will have to find an alternative method. The country has decided to follow in China's footsteps and has banned raising money through all forms of virtual currency, according to Reute…

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Equifax breach shows signs of a possible state-sponsored hack

Ever since word of the Equifax hack got out, there's been one lingering question: was it a state-sponsored attack, or just criminals who took advantage of a security hole? At the moment, it looks like it might be the former. Bloomberg sources have sh…

It's just that after the name was created and even trademarked, that the company realised what it had done.

"It was only after we trademarked it that I realized that it also stood for Kim Jong-un, but never mind,” Alan Jope, the company’s head of personal care, was quoted by Bloomberg as saying.

The new KJU line

The new KJU line

Image: Unilever

The KJU range of soaps was created for the Chinese market, after a development period of six months. Read more...

More about China, South Korea, Kim Jong Un, Cosmetics, and Unilever'>
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Oops, Unilever didn’t mean to name its new body soap after Kim Jong-un

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That new KJU line of body soaps and mist fragrances from Unilever isn’t named after Kim Jong-un, Unilever would like you to know.

It’s just that after the name was created and even trademarked, that the company realised what it had done.

“It was only after we trademarked it that I realized that it also stood for Kim Jong-un, but never mind,” Alan Jope, the company’s head of personal care, was quoted by Bloomberg as saying.

The new KJU line

The new KJU line

Image: Unilever

The KJU range of soaps was created for the Chinese market, after a development period of six months. Read more…

More about China, South Korea, Kim Jong Un, Cosmetics, and Unilever

It's just that after the name was created and even trademarked, that the company realised what it had done.

"It was only after we trademarked it that I realized that it also stood for Kim Jong-un, but never mind,” Alan Jope, the company’s head of personal care, was quoted by Bloomberg as saying.

The new KJU line

The new KJU line

Image: Unilever

The KJU range of soaps was created for the Chinese market, after a development period of six months. Read more...

More about China, South Korea, Kim Jong Un, Cosmetics, and Unilever'>
,

Oops, Unilever didn’t mean to name its new body soap after Kim Jong-un

TwitterFacebook

That new KJU line of body soaps and mist fragrances from Unilever isn’t named after Kim Jong-un, Unilever would like you to know.

It’s just that after the name was created and even trademarked, that the company realised what it had done.

“It was only after we trademarked it that I realized that it also stood for Kim Jong-un, but never mind,” Alan Jope, the company’s head of personal care, was quoted by Bloomberg as saying.

The new KJU line

The new KJU line

Image: Unilever

The KJU range of soaps was created for the Chinese market, after a development period of six months. Read more…

More about China, South Korea, Kim Jong Un, Cosmetics, and Unilever

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First China, now South Korea has banned ICOs

 South Korea has banned ICOs, the up-and-coming method of raising funding via crypto tokens, due to concerns over the potential for financial scams. China’s Central Bank became the first to outlaw ICOs, which are also known as token sales, in a move made earlier this month and now Korea is following suit. Companies from across the world have raised more than $1.8 billion this year to… Read More

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‘Timberscrapers’ could soon dominate urban skylines

They just don't make 'em like the Sakyamuni Pagoda anymore. Built from wood in 1056 in the Shanxi province of China, the building has remained standing to this day despite seven earthquakes rattling the region within its first 50 years of existence….

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China largely blocks WhatsApp’s text message workaround

WhatsApp's existence in China has been hanging by a thread ever since its government blocked users from sending photos and videos in July. Now, it appears that the app no longer works in the country at all. According to Symbolic Software, a Paris-bas…

On Monday it appeared the messaging app had been blocked throughout the country, according to the New York Times. The app joins other Facebook-owned apps censored by the Chinese government: Facebook and Instagram.

Facebook has been blocked in China since 2009, so that's nothing new. But WhatsApp had slowly become more and more restricted since July, according to the New York Times. Video chats, photo and file sharing, and voice chats were harder to use. Within the past week, WhatsApp and other VPN services had been unstable. And on Monday the entire app apparently went down — texts couldn't even go through. Read more...

More about Facebook, China, Censorship, Government, and Whatsapp'>
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WhatsApp gets blocked behind China’s ‘Great Firewall,’ joining Facebook and Instagram

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It looks like WhatsApp has joined similar apps and websites pushed behind China’s online censorship efforts, the so-called “Great Firewall.”

On Monday it appeared the messaging app had been blocked throughout the country, according to the New York Times. The app joins other Facebook-owned apps censored by the Chinese government: Facebook and Instagram.

Facebook has been blocked in China since 2009, so that’s nothing new. But WhatsApp had slowly become more and more restricted since July, according to the New York Times. Video chats, photo and file sharing, and voice chats were harder to use. Within the past week, WhatsApp and other VPN services had been unstable. And on Monday the entire app apparently went down — texts couldn’t even go through. Read more…

More about Facebook, China, Censorship, Government, and Whatsapp