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China targets livestreaming in latest censorship crackdown

China just shut down livestreaming on three major media platforms -- Weibo, the news site iFeng and the video website ACFUN. China's State Administration of Press, Publication, Radio, Film and Television sent notices to the companies ordering them to...
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Sick of censoring content, China bans livestreaming altogether

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Chinese authorities have sent shockwaves through the social media sphere, with a blanket ban on livestreaming across three major online platforms.

On Thursday, the government ordered Weibo, iFeng and ACFUN to stop all its video and audio streaming services, according to an FT report.

Weibo, China's version of Twitter, and one of its largest social networks, acknowledged that it received the directive from the government, and that it's working to figure out which users would be affected.

Weibo has some 340 million active users, and relies heavily on video streaming for revenue. Read more...

More about China, Censorship, Streaming, Weibo, and Livestreaming
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Sick of censoring content, China bans livestreaming altogether

TwitterFacebook

Chinese authorities have sent shockwaves through the social media sphere, with a blanket ban on livestreaming across three major online platforms.

On Thursday, the government ordered Weibo, iFeng and ACFUN to stop all its video and audio streaming services, according to an FT report.

Weibo, China's version of Twitter, and one of its largest social networks, acknowledged that it received the directive from the government, and that it's working to figure out which users would be affected.

Weibo has some 340 million active users, and relies heavily on video streaming for revenue. Read more...

More about China, Censorship, Streaming, Weibo, and Livestreaming
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School in China literally cracks down on students’ phones

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Many schools frown upon students bringing phones to school. And this one means business.

A middle school in Guiyang, a city in southwest China, is going viral for actually destroying phones that it confiscates. 

And as if it couldn't get any worse, the phones, which are first soaked in water, are then smashed with a hammer in front of the entire school. 

WATCH: This middle school in China's Guizhou province enforces its ban on cellphones with a hammer. What's your take on it? pic.twitter.com/SzdQto4q27

— People's Daily,China (@PDChina) June 22, 2017 Read more...

More about China, Education, School, Phones, and Discipline
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China clamps down on live-streaming services

 The Chinese government has cracked down on three of the country’s top live-streaming services over their apparent broadcast of unsuitable political content. Weibo, the Nasdaq-listed microblogging site, disclosed that it had received a notice from The State Administration of Press, Publication, Radio, Film and Television of the People’s Republic of China (‘SAPPRFT’)… Read More
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Tesla is laying the groundwork to build cars in Shanghai

If you've been waiting to pull the trigger on one of Tesla's electric vehicles, the upcoming Model 3 probably looks pretty appealing. The car promises 215 miles per charge, ample seating, the tech for autopilot and it starts at just $35,000. Well, un...

AM General, which previously built the Hummer H2, sold its factory in South Bend, Indiana to the electric carmaker SF Motors, both firms announced  Thursday.

SF Motors will pay $110 million to produce "intelligent electric vehicles," according to publicly available filings. It will spend another $30 million to upgrade the 700,000-square-foot commercial assembly plant.

The company didn't elaborate further on its plans for the factory, such as how many cars it will produce annually or what types of smart driving or electric-powertrain technologies they'll use. But executives said the arrangement will preserve about 430 U.S. auto worker jobs that were at risk of disappearing.  Read more...

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Hummer factory gets second life making electric cars

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A U.S. auto plant that once made giant gas-guzzlers will now make cars that don't need gas at all.

AM General, which previously built the Hummer H2, sold its factory in South Bend, Indiana to the electric carmaker SF Motors, both firms announced  Thursday.

SF Motors will pay $110 million to produce "intelligent electric vehicles," according to publicly available filings. It will spend another $30 million to upgrade the 700,000-square-foot commercial assembly plant.

The company didn't elaborate further on its plans for the factory, such as how many cars it will produce annually or what types of smart driving or electric-powertrain technologies they'll use. But executives said the arrangement will preserve about 430 U.S. auto worker jobs that were at risk of disappearing.  Read more...

More about Science, China, Tesla, Climate Change, and Automobiles

It's called the toothpick crossbow.

The tiny toy shoots little sharpened skewers that can apparently pierce through several layers of cardboard, apples, and lightbulbs.

With the toothpick replaced by a metal needle, meanwhile, the devices can even punch holes in soda cans.

Here's one in action.

Lightbulbs don't stand a chance.

What's worse is the crossbow only costs the equivalent of one dollar. So they're not hard to come by. Read more...

More about China, Dangerous, Crossbow, Fidget Spinner, and Fidget Toy'>
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Forget fidget spinners — there’s a new toy craze scaring parents

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Forget about the supposed dangers associated with the fidget spinner — there's a new toy fad taking China by storm that is making parents scared.

It's called the toothpick crossbow.

The tiny toy shoots little sharpened skewers that can apparently pierce through several layers of cardboard, apples, and lightbulbs.

With the toothpick replaced by a metal needle, meanwhile, the devices can even punch holes in soda cans.

Here's one in action.

Lightbulbs don't stand a chance.

What's worse is the crossbow only costs the equivalent of one dollar. So they're not hard to come by. Read more...

More about China, Dangerous, Crossbow, Fidget Spinner, and Fidget Toy

Wukong Bike — one of an estimated 30 bike-sharing startups in China — has closed after a mere six months of operations. It had no choice: it lost nearly 90 percent of its bicycles to mischief and theft. 

The company had a fleet of 1,200 bicycles in the city of Chongqing.

A rare group photo of the bicycles.

A rare group photo of the bicycles.

Image: Wukong bicycle/Weibo

Like many of its competitors, Wukong offered bikes for rent under the Uber model of "sharing" a bike — grab one off the street, unlock it with an app, and simply leave it by the side of the street at your destination. Read more...

More about China, Sharing Economy, Mobike, Ofo, and Bike Sharing'>
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People stole nearly all of the bikes belonging to a shared-bike startup, so it had to close down

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All of those vandalised bikes were going to drive one of China's bike-sharing companies out of business sooner or later. That time has come. 

Wukong Bike — one of an estimated 30 bike-sharing startups in China — has closed after a mere six months of operations. It had no choice: it lost nearly 90 percent of its bicycles to mischief and theft. 

The company had a fleet of 1,200 bicycles in the city of Chongqing.

A rare group photo of the bicycles.

A rare group photo of the bicycles.

Image: Wukong bicycle/Weibo

Like many of its competitors, Wukong offered bikes for rent under the Uber model of "sharing" a bike — grab one off the street, unlock it with an app, and simply leave it by the side of the street at your destination. Read more...

More about China, Sharing Economy, Mobike, Ofo, and Bike Sharing
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JD.com invests $397M into luxury marketplace Farfetch as part of a new strategic partnership

 JD.com, China’s second-largest e-commerce company after Alibaba, is pumping $397 million into Farfetch, a marketplace for luxury brands, as part of a new strategic partnership. JD.com founder and CEO Richard Liu will take a seat on Farfetch’s board as part of the deal, which makes JD.com one of its largest shareholders. Read More